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THURSDAY, 24 APR 2014
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Edvard Munch at pains to win favor in Norway
Agence France Presse
An art critic eyes Munch’s “Self portrait” hanging in the Royal Academy of Arts in London.
An art critic eyes Munch’s “Self portrait” hanging in the Royal Academy of Arts in London.
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OSLO: He may be acclaimed in the art world and coveted by thieves but Edvard Munch is starved of recognition in his native Norway, where squabbles have delayed a new museum worthy of his oeuvre.

Next year will mark the 150th anniversary of the birth of the expressionist master, who painted the now-iconic “The Scream.” But the anniversary is clouded by the city of Oslo’s inability to provide a proper setting for the art gems the painter left in his will.

Munch, who died in 1944, bequeathed an enormous collection to the Norwegian capital, including 1,100 paintings, 3,000 drawings and 18,000 etchings. The current Munch Museum, constructed cheaply after World War II in a rather rundown Oslo neighborhood, does not do justice to the priceless trove.

“It’s time to have something more modern that would enable us to better welcome the public and exhibit Munch’s work from other perspectives, in broader contexts,” said museum director Stein Olav Henrichsen, “both his and ours.”

While all agree on the need for a better museum, there are divisions over where to place it.

Oslo’s city council agreed in 2008 to erect a building near the new, futuristic opera house on the shores of the Oslo fjord, but those plans were scrapped three years later when the populist right suddenly withdrew its support without a concrete explanation.

The move was a shock and an embarrassment. A Spanish architecture firm had already been hired and had drawn up plans for Lambda, a super-modern leaning glass building, to great expense.

The issue has been at a standstill ever since, and Oslo has been unable to come to an agreement on any of the current options.

Those include a return to the Spanish concept or a move to the ageing main building of downtown Oslo’s National Gallery. Another option is the total renovation of the museum’s current location just outside the city center. All are estimated to cost around 1.6 billion kroner ($285 million).

Failure to reach agreement could be interpreted as a Norwegian cold shoulder to the country’s most famous artist, in sharp contrast to his huge international appeal.

A million people recently visited a Munch exhibit that toured Paris, Frankfurt and London. One of the four versions of “The Scream” was sold this year at a New York auction for the record sum of $119.9 million.

By comparison, the Munch Museum in Oslo attracts around 126,000 visitors per year, even though it owns two versions of “The Scream,” perhaps the most famous expression of existential angst.

It’s not certain the visitor numbers will soar even if Oslo gets a brand new Munch museum.

“I don’t think Norwegians really understand the power of Edvard Munch’s work,” Henrichsen said. “His cultural and economic importance is underestimated here.”

The artist’s descendants are eager to see the issue resolved.

The impasse, in the opinion of Elisabeth Munch Ellingsen, his great-great-niece, is “shameful and scandalous ... Considering the treasure they’re sitting on, it’s shameful the local politicians can’t find a solution. When they decided to apply to host the Olympic Winter Games, it took them five minutes.”

Ellingsen has sent a letter to the government asking it to intervene. Culture Minister Hadia Tajik responded that Munch’s bequest was to the city of Oslo and not the state.

While Munch features on Norway’s highest-value banknote of 1,000 kroner, this is not the first time the artist’s legacy has been mistreated.

Oslo demolished the home he left to the city in his will and turned part of the land into a parking lot in 1960.

In Norway, it sometimes seems the only ones who really covet Munch are thieves. Two versions of “The Scream” were stolen in 1994 and 2004. Both paintings were later recovered.

 
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