BEIRUT

Lubnan

Acra aims for the red carpet, menswear inspires Noon by Noor

BEIRUT: In keeping with several seasons of dark glamor, Reem Acra showed another moody collection in black, purple and gold Monday as part of New York Fashion Week.

Acra’s spring ready-to-wear was all 1970s disco, and for fall, she brought show-goers back another two decades with basic A-line skirts that fell below the knee and buttoned up cashmere cardigans reminiscent of more conservative ’50s fashion.

Spring foliage in a winter color palette crept down the shoulder of a basic knit cardigan paired with a loose knee-length skirt in winter white. That same cherry-blossom embellishment returned in a series of wrap dresses with furry collars and form-fitting shifts. The pattern had an East Asian feel when Acra embroidered it into velvet and silk overcoats with loose, open sleeves.

Models, clad in sinister hues, had a bit of the black swan about them, wearing short dresses and skirt-and-jacket sets covered in feathers.

Also drawing from decades past, Acra gave a nod to old Hollywood glam with fur shrugs, thick belts that mimicked corseted waistlines, capes and elbow-length gloves.

Acra has become a staple designer for contemporary Hollywood stars, and the second half of her show is bound to make a return on the red carpet when celebrities dress up next winter.

Among those star-ready ensembles were embellished silk evening gowns and sheaths covered in floral embroidery and black damask-pattern transparencies over pink and red silk.

In addition to pleasing her star clientele, Acra, a New York-based Lebanese designer, might be making more of an appearance in these parts. She recently told Agence France Presse that she intends to give the Middle East’s design industry a boost. And speaking of the region’s burgeoning design industry, Bahraini design label Noon by Noor also presented Monday.

Fall-winter 2015 was the fourth New York show for the sheikha pair behind Noon by Nour: Noor al-Khalifa and Haya al-Khalifa. In four seasons, the young designers have consistently imbued their collections with a bit of vintage. In past collections, the retro vibe channeled collegiate tastes circa 1950. This season, Noon by Noor drew their inspiration from grandpa with platform oxfords, square-cut wool overcoats in bold cobalt and men’s trousers.

The label’s nod to vintage menswear was broken every so often with rich velvet gowns, sheer chiffon skirts and floral beading.

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on February 12, 2014, on page 2.

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Summary

In keeping with several seasons of dark glamor, Reem Acra showed another moody collection in black, purple and gold Monday as part of New York Fashion Week.

Acra's spring ready-to-wear was all 1970s disco, and for fall, she brought show-goers back another two decades with basic A-line skirts that fell below the knee and buttoned up cashmere cardigans reminiscent of more conservative '50s fashion.

Spring foliage in a winter color palette crept down the shoulder of a basic knit cardigan paired with a loose knee-length skirt in winter white.

The pattern had an East Asian feel when Acra embroidered it into velvet and silk overcoats with loose, open sleeves.


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