Mobile  |  About us  |  Photos  |  Videos  |  Subscriptions  |  RSS Feeds  |  Today's Paper  |  Classifieds  |  Contact Us
The Daily Star
THURSDAY, 24 APR 2014
03:49 PM Beirut time
Weather    
Beirut
30 °C
Blom Index
BLOM
1,214.01down
Environment
Follow this story Print RSS Feed ePaper share this
Smoking Indonesian orangutan gives birth
Agence France Presse
Tori, the 15-year-old orangutan famed for smoking when she was five, holds her days-old baby at the zoo in Solo-Central Java, on September 28, 2012. (AFP PHOTO / Anwar MUSTAFA)
Tori, the 15-year-old orangutan famed for smoking when she was five, holds her days-old baby at the zoo in Solo-Central Java, on September 28, 2012. (AFP PHOTO / Anwar MUSTAFA)
A+ A-

JAKARTA: An orangutan famous for puffing on cigarettes gave birth this week at an Indonesian zoo, an official said Friday, in a rare event giving a boon to the critically endangered species.

Tori, 15, gave birth on Wednesday in the central Javanese city of Solo, Taru Jurug Zoo director Lilik Kristanto told AFP.

"The delivery took place naturally without human intervention," he said.

Visitors had for 10 years tossed cigarettes to the famous smoking orangutan, who was moved in July to a 200-meter island at the zoo to force her to quit cold turkey.

Kristanto said Tori gave birth on the island, where she is being kept with her mate and baby.

"We're very happy. The baby is healthy and Tori is a good mother," he said, adding that the orangutan smoked through most of her pregnancy.

Tori mated with a 20-year-old orangutan in November 2011 and the birth is the first at the zoo since Tori was born.

"Orangutans are critically endangered, so this is good news for conservation. We have another young orangutan pair here, so I hope there will be more orangutan babies here in the future," he said.

Indonesian zoos have drawn international criticism for poor treatment of animals. In March, a giraffe at an eastern Java zoo was found dead with a 20-kilogram (44-pound) beachball-size lump of plastic in its stomach from visitors' food wrappers thrown into its pen.

Experts believe that between 50,000 and 60,000 of the two orangutan species are left in the wild, 80 percent of them in Indonesia and the rest in Malaysia.

Orangutans are faced with extinction from poaching and the rapid destruction of their forest habitat, driven largely by palm oil and paper plantations.

 
Home Environment
 
     
 
Indonesia
Advertisement
Comments  

Your feedback is important to us!

We invite all our readers to share with us their views and comments about this article.

Disclaimer: Comments submitted by third parties on this site are the sole responsibility of the individual(s) whose content is submitted. The Daily Star accepts no responsibility for the content of comment(s), including, without limitation, any error, omission or inaccuracy therein. Please note that your email address will NOT appear on the site.

comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement


Baabda 2014
Advertisement
Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Linked In Follow us on Google+ Subscribe to our Live Feed
Multimedia
Images  
Pictures of the day
A selection of images from around the world- Thursday April 24, 2014
View all view all
Advertisement
Rami G. Khouri
Rami G. Khouri
Israel shows Zionism’s true colors
Michael Young
Michael Young
For Christians, blessed are the dividers
David Ignatius
David Ignatius
An Iran deal is close, but we’re not there yet
View all view all
Advertisement
cartoon
 
Click to View Articles
 
 
News
Business
Opinion
Sports
Culture
Technology
Entertainment
Privacy Policy | Anti-Spamming Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright Notice
© 2014 The Daily Star - All Rights Reserved - Designed and Developed By IDS