Mobile  |  About us  |  Photos  |  Videos  |  Subscriptions  |  RSS Feeds  |  Today's Paper  |  Classifieds  |  Contact Us
The Daily Star
THURSDAY, 24 APR 2014
10:01 AM Beirut time
Weather    
Beirut
22 °C
Blom Index
BLOM
1,214.01down
International
Follow this story Print RSS Feed ePaper share this
S. Korea president weighs in on 'missing' summit papers
Agence France Presse
This file picture taken on February 25, 2013 shows South Korea's incoming president Park Geun-Hye (C) speaking during her presidential inauguration ceremony at the National Assembly in Seoul. AFP PHOTO / FILES / JUNG YEON-JE
This file picture taken on February 25, 2013 shows South Korea's incoming president Park Geun-Hye (C) speaking during her presidential inauguration ceremony at the National Assembly in Seoul. AFP PHOTO / FILES / JUNG YEON-JE
A+ A-

SEOUL: South Korean President Park Geun-Hye condemned what she termed an attempt "to erase history" as she weighed in Tuesday on a murky case involving a missing inter-Korean summit transcript.

The document at the heart of what has become a heated political row, is the official record of remarks made at the 2007 summit between then South Korean president Roh Moo-Hyun and North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il.

Last year, lawmakers from Park's ruling conservative party whipped up a storm over leaks sourced to the National Intelligence Service, suggesting that Roh had offered the North a major compromise over the disputed western sea border.

In June, the NIS declassified its version of the summit talks -- a move the opposition claimed was aimed at deflecting attention from a parallel row over charges that the spy agency meddled in the 2012 presidential election.

Park won the election, beating the opposition candidate Moon Jae-In, who had served as Roh' presidential chief of staff.

As the debate intensified over what Roh actually said at the 2007 summit, the decision was taken to consult the official transcript kept in the presidential archive.

But when officials went looking, they couldn't find it -- prompting the ruling and opposition parties to trade fresh accusations of skullduggery.

Park had previously declined to comment on the case, but on Tuesday she raised the issue at a meeting with cabinet colleagues, the Yonhap news agency reported.

"The unheard-of incident of an important presidential record disappearing was an attempt to shake national discipline and erase history," the agency quoted Park as saying.

"It should have never happened," she added, without suggesting who might be responsible for the disappearance.

Her Saenuri Party has been less reticent.

"Unimaginable things are happening now," it said in a statement last month."It made us wonder if the original transcript of the inter-Korean summit was destroyed on former President Roh's order."

The opposition meanwhile continues to insist that Roh made no compromise offer on the sea border and says the entire debate has been cooked up by the NIS to relieve the pressure it is under over the charges of election meddling.

NIS agents stand accused of trying to manipulate voters online against Moon Jae-In's candidacy.

 
Home International
 
     
 
South Korea
Advertisement
Comments  

Your feedback is important to us!

We invite all our readers to share with us their views and comments about this article.

Disclaimer: Comments submitted by third parties on this site are the sole responsibility of the individual(s) whose content is submitted. The Daily Star accepts no responsibility for the content of comment(s), including, without limitation, any error, omission or inaccuracy therein. Please note that your email address will NOT appear on the site.

comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement


Baabda 2014
Advertisement
Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Linked In Follow us on Google+ Subscribe to our Live Feed
Multimedia
Images  
Pictures of the day
A selection of images from around the world- Wednesday, April 23, 2014
View all view all
Advertisement
Rami G. Khouri
Rami G. Khouri
Israel shows Zionism’s true colors
Michael Young
Michael Young
For Christians, blessed are the dividers
David Ignatius
David Ignatius
An Iran deal is close, but we’re not there yet
View all view all
Advertisement
cartoon
 
Click to View Articles
 
 
News
Business
Opinion
Sports
Culture
Technology
Entertainment
Privacy Policy | Anti-Spamming Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright Notice
© 2014 The Daily Star - All Rights Reserved - Designed and Developed By IDS