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Indian official: Diplomat’s arrest in New York barbaric
Associated Press
Indian police remove barricades that had been erected as a safety measure outside the main entrance of U.S Embassy, reportedly in retaliation to the alleged mistreatment of New York based Indian diplomat Devyani Khobragade, in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2013.  (AP Photo)
Indian police remove barricades that had been erected as a safety measure outside the main entrance of U.S Embassy, reportedly in retaliation to the alleged mistreatment of New York based Indian diplomat Devyani Khobragade, in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2013. (AP Photo)
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NEW DELHI: The arrest and alleged strip search of an Indian diplomat in New York City escalated into a diplomatic furor Tuesday as India’s national security adviser called the woman’s treatment “despicable and barbaric.”

Devyani Khobragade, India’s deputy consul general in New York, is accused of submitting false documents to obtain a work visa for her Manhattan housekeeper. Indian officials said she was arrested and handcuffed Thursday as she dropped off her daughter at school and was kept in a cell with drug addicts before posting $250,000 bail.

A senior Indian official confirmed reports that she also was strip-searched, which has been portrayed in India as the most offensive and troubling part of the arrest.

India was ready to retaliate against American diplomats in India by threatening to downgrade privileges and demanding information about how much they pay their Indian household staff, according to the Press Trust of India news agency.

Police also removed the traffic barricades near the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi, a demand by the Indian government in retaliation for Khobragade’s treatment, PTI reported. The barriers were a safety measure.

“We got orders to remove the concrete barriers,” said Amardeep Sehgal, station house officer of the Chanakyapuri police station, the one nearest the embassy. “They were obstructing traffic on the road.” He refused to say who had given the orders.

Calls to the U.S. Embassy were not immediately returned Tuesday.

National Security Adviser Shivshankar Menon slammed Khobragade’s treatment in New York, saying: “It is despicable and barbaric.”

Prosecutors in New York say Khobragade, 39, claimed she paid her Indian maid $4,500 per month but actually paid her less than the U.S. minimum wage. In order for diplomats and consular officers to get a visa for their personal employees, known as an A-3 visa, they must show proof that the applicant will receive a fair wage, comparable to employment in the United States, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement last week.

Federal prosecutors say Khobragade told the housekeeper she would be paid 30,000 rupees per month – about $573, or $3.31 per hour. The woman worked for the family from about November 2012 through June 2013 and said she worked far more than 40 hours per week and was paid even less than 30,000 rupees, prosecutors said.

Khobragade has pleaded not guilty and plans to challenge the arrest on grounds of diplomatic immunity, her lawyer said last week.

If convicted, Khobragade faces a maximum sentence of 10 years for visa fraud and five years for making a false declaration.

Her case quickly became a major story in India, with politicians urging diplomatic retaliation and TV news channels showing the woman in a series of smiling family photos.

That reaction may look outsized in the United States, but the case touches on a string of issues that strike deeply in India, where the fear of public humiliation resonates strongly and heavy-handed treatment by the police is normally reserved for the poor. For an educated, middle-class woman to face public arrest and a strip search is almost unimaginable, except in the most brutal crimes.

Far less serious protocol complaints have become big issues in the past. Standard security checks in the U.S. regularly are front-page news here when they involve visiting Indian dignitaries, who are largely exempt from frisking while at home.

India’s former speaker of Parliament, Somnath Chatterjee, once refused to attend an international meeting in Australia when he wasn’t given a guarantee that he would not have to pass through security. Chatterjee said even the possibility of a security screening was “an affront to India.”

The treatment and pay of household staff, meanwhile, is largely seen as a family issue, off-limits to the law.

The fallout from the arrest was growing. Indian political leaders from both the ruling party and the opposition refused to meet Tuesday with the U.S. congressional delegation in New Delhi. The Indian government said it was “shocked and appalled at the manner in which the diplomat had been humiliated” in the U.S.

Indian Foreign Secretary Sujata Singh summoned U.S. Ambassador Nancy Powell to register a complaint.

In Washington, U.S. State Department deputy Marie Harf said Tuesday that the department’s diplomatic security team followed standard procedures during the arrest. After her arrest, Khobragade was handed over to U.S. marshals for intake and processing, she said.

Harf also noted the difference between diplomatic immunity and consular immunity. Under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, the Indian deputy consul general enjoys immunity from the jurisdiction of U.S. courts only with respect to acts performed in the exercise of consular functions, she said.

Khobragade’s father, Uttam Khobragade, told the TimesNow TV news channel Tuesday that his daughter’s treatment was “absolutely obnoxious.”

“As a father I feel hurt, our entire family is traumatized,” he said.

Indian External Affairs Minister Salman Khurshid said there were “larger issues” involved in the case, but did not elaborate.

“We will deal with them in good time,” he said.

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on December 18, 2013, on page 10.
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