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WEDNESDAY, 23 APR 2014
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Pakistan doctor who helped find bin Laden in legal tussle
Agence France Presse
This photograph taken on July 22, 2010, shows Pakistani surgeon Shakeel Afridi, who was working for CIA to help find Osama bin Laden. (AFP PHOTO / MOHAMMAD RAUF)
This photograph taken on July 22, 2010, shows Pakistani surgeon Shakeel Afridi, who was working for CIA to help find Osama bin Laden. (AFP PHOTO / MOHAMMAD RAUF)
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PESHAWAR, Pakistan: A Pakistani doctor jailed after helping the CIA find Osama bin Laden faces fresh legal wrangling after an appeal tribunal Wednesday said a retrial order was "ambiguous" and needed clarification.

Shakeel Afridi was convicted of treason under the country's tribal justice system for alleged ties to militants and jailed for 33 years in May 2012, but the authorities set aside the sentence in August on appeal and ordered a retrial.

Lawyers for the doctor challenged the August ruling, made by the commissioner of the northwestern city of Peshawar, in the Federally-Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) Tribunal.

They sought bail for Afridi and argued that the retrial should involve a complete re-investigation of the case including hearing and cross-examining witnesses again, and not simply a reconsideration of the existing evidence.

The FATA Tribunal said Wednesday in a written judgment that the August ruling was "ambiguous and self-contradictory" and directed the Peshawar commissioner to issue a fresh order to clarify matters.

"The tribunal has asked him to remove ambiguities from his order and make a clear decision and send it back to us," tribunal chairman Shah Wali Khan told reporters after issuing the order.

Afridi was arrested after US troops killed Al-Qaeda chief bin Laden in May 2011 in the northwestern town of Abbottabad. Islamabad branded the raid a violation of sovereignty and US relations fell to an all-time low.

Afridi had been recruited by the CIA to run a vaccination programme in Abbottabad in the hope of obtaining DNA samples to identify bin Laden, although medics never managed to gain access to the family.

He was convicted not for working for the CIA, for which the court said it had no jurisdiction -- but for alleged ties to militants.

Angry lawmakers in the US saw the original sentence as retaliation for the bin Laden raid and threatened to freeze millions of dollars in vital aid to Pakistan.

The then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton denounced Afridi's treatment as "unjust and unwarranted".

 
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