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FRIDAY, 18 APR 2014
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Deadly Kabul attack throws aid work into peril
Agence France Presse
Afghan members of civil society organizations chant slogans as they march in a street of Wazir Akbar Khan, during an anti terrorism demonstration in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014.(AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)
Afghan members of civil society organizations chant slogans as they march in a street of Wazir Akbar Khan, during an anti terrorism demonstration in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014.(AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)
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KABUL: A discreet beer over plates of mezze was one of few comforts on offer to aid workers and diplomats in Kabul, but a bloodbath at a Lebanese restaurant could mean many foreigners will leave Afghanistan when the country needs them most.

The murder of 21 people, 13 of them foreigners, in the Taverna du Liban Friday evening has forced aid organizations, international institutions and consultancies to re-assess how they can continue to work in the city.

“We could all have been there,” said Valerie Docher, head of mission for the French aid group MRCA, which runs health programs in several Afghan provinces.

“We will have to ask questions in the coming days about our security. This attack will necessarily have an impact,” she said.

Docher said the response of many international setups would be to reduce trips outside their fortified compounds and vary daily staff routines to avoid becoming predictable.

“But, at some point, it becomes clear that that is not enough,” Docher admitted.

Kabul has been transformed since the dark days of Taliban rule, and one side effect is a small social scene catering to wealthier Afghans and more adventurous foreign workers.

There is now a modern bowling alley and a handful of restaurants hidden behind security gates and armed guards.

Foreigners have been targeted before at guesthouses, luxury hotels and embassies in the city, but hitting a civilian social venue appears to signal a new and ruthless stage of the 13-year Taliban insurgency.

“I am very worried, I think unless a miracle happens, my restaurant and many other businesses in Kabul may have to close,” said Mohammad Azim Popal, manager of Sufi, which attracts a mixed clientele of locals and expats.

“When the attack happened, there were many foreigners dining here, but they left in hurry.

“I have called some of them to assure them and say that I will double the guards, but they are skeptical.

“My Afghan customers come with their expat friends, and with this attack I have lost them all.”

Wrecked by decades of war, Afghanistan remains reliant on outside assistance despite billions of dollars of aid since the Taliban regime was ousted in 2001.

Foreign consultants help develop its tax system, aid groups run education and health projects, and embassies and the U.N. lobby against corruption and try to promote human rights, reconciliation and democracy.

But the insurgents appear set on banishing any international presence from the country as it faces a huge period of change and uncertainty with the U.S.-led NATO combat mission ending this year and presidential elections due in April.

“NGOs are wondering whether they keep teams of expats, whether the country is safe or not,” said Florian Caillibotte, country head of Afghanistan Libre, an aid group that runs projects helping vulnerable young women and girls.

“This attack probably heralds a volatile period ahead of the elections, although it is difficult to know what will happen next.”

The aid effort in Afghanistan has overcome disasters before – 10 aid workers were killed in Badakhshan province in 2010.

But experts say the latest attack poses an unprecedented dilemma for those on the ground.

“This was an attack on foreign civilians targeted merely for being foreign – a rare occasion in this Afghan war,” the Afghanistan Analysts Network said in a report released Sunday.

“[It] may be a game changer, with particular consequences for aid work.

“[The Taverna attack] raises questions on how civilian aid, particularly through NGOs, can be provided – and elections monitored later this year – if soft targets are no longer off limits.”

Organizations mourning dead colleagues released tributes to dedicated employees who choose to leave home and work in a dangerous environment to help one of the world’s most troubled countries.

Despite the deaths, many vowed not to abandon Afghanistan.

UNICEF, which lost one Somali-American and one Pakistani employee, expressed its “determination to continue the work that our colleagues gave their lives for.”

The American University of Afghanistan in Kabul announced it would hold all its lectures despite the loss of two U.S. staffers.

“Such senseless violence flies in the face of the sentiments of our students and the Afghan people who share our grief,” AUA head Michael Smith said.

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on January 20, 2014, on page 11.
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Story Summary
A discreet beer over plates of mezze was one of few comforts on offer to aid workers and diplomats in Kabul, but a bloodbath at a Lebanese restaurant could mean many foreigners will leave Afghanistan when the country needs them most.

The murder of 21 people, 13 of them foreigners, in the Taverna du Liban Friday evening has forced aid organizations, international institutions and consultancies to re-assess how they can continue to work in the city.

Kabul has been transformed since the dark days of Taliban rule, and one side effect is a small social scene catering to wealthier Afghans and more adventurous foreign workers.

Wrecked by decades of war, Afghanistan remains reliant on outside assistance despite billions of dollars of aid since the Taliban regime was ousted in 2001 .

The aid effort in Afghanistan has overcome disasters before – 10 aid workers were killed in Badakhshan province in 2010 .
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