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Sinn Fein chief detained 3rd day over IRA killing

The heavily fortified Police station in Antrim, Northern Ireland, Thursday, May, 1 2014. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)

BELFAST: Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams remained in police custody for a third day Friday as detectives questioned him over his alleged role in the Irish Republican Army killing of a Belfast mother of 10 in 1972.

Under British anti-terrorist law Adams, 65, must be charged or released by Friday night, unless a judge approves an extension. Other senior figures in Adams' Irish nationalist party have accused those behind Wednesday's arrest of their leader of pursuing an anti-Sinn Fein agenda.

Adams, who as the Sinn Fein chief since 1983 is Europe's longest-serving party leader, denies any role in the outlawed IRA. Former members who spoke on tape to a Boston College-commissioned research project have linked him to the abduction, slaying and secret burial of Jean McConville, a 38-year-old widow whom the IRA branded a British spy. An official 2006 investigation dismissed this claim.

The daughter who has led a two-decade campaign for the truth says she's praying for a murder charge - and is prepared to name publicly those IRA members she believes are responsible. Her other siblings say they're too afraid to do this because it could inspire IRA attacks on themselves or their children.

"What are they going to do to me? They have done so much to me in the last 42 years. Are they going to come and put a bullet in my head? Well, they know where I live," Helen McKendry told the BBC Newsnight program.

Sinn Fein, the major Irish nationalist party in Northern Ireland, has accused Protestant leaders of pressuring police to arrest Adams now to undermine Sinn Fein before elections this month in both Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, where Adams leads Sinn Fein in the Irish parliament.

But First Minister Peter Robinson, the Protestant who leads Northern Ireland's government alongside Sinn Fein deputy leader Martin McGuinness, called Adams' arrest an overdue act of political accountability. He suggested McGuinness should face the same criminal scrutiny.

Robinson said the arrest "strengthens our political process in Northern Ireland for people to know that no one is above the law."

Robinson appealed to McConville's children to tell police the identities of the IRA members who stormed into their home in the Divis Flats welfare housing project just before Christmas 1972. He said Sinn Fein should encourage them to come forward, free from fear of IRA retaliation.

McKendry's younger brother Michael, who was 11 at the time, recalled screaming children clinging to their mother's legs as IRA members pulled her, tearful and wailing in fear, out the door.

He said unmasked IRA members calmed the children by calling them each by their first names and asked one of his older brothers to come with their mother outside. Once at the stairwell, he said, one IRA member stuck a gun to that boy's head and told him to get lost.

To this day, Michael McConville said, he sees some of these IRA veterans walking down the street in Belfast. And to this day, he fears testifying against them.

"I do know the names of the people. I wouldn't tell the police," he told the AP at a victims' support center in Belfast. "I knew the ones that hadn't got masks on, they were neighbors from the area. My older brother, Archie, probably recognized more of them. My older sister, Agnes, probably recognized more of them as well. But everybody tells you the IRA's gone away. They haven't. They're still our neighbors, and we're still afraid of them."

When asked whether he would accept a Sinn Fein guarantee that no IRA member would shoot him, his wife or his children, he said he couldn't trust them.

"There's different ways of killing people. You could be crossing the road and get knocked down," he said. "They weren't accountable when they killed my mother. They could kill me, or one of my loved ones, and never admit it all over again."

 

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Summary

Other senior figures in Adams' Irish nationalist party have accused those behind Wednesday's arrest of their leader of pursuing an anti-Sinn Fein agenda.

Adams, who as the Sinn Fein chief since 1983 is Europe's longest-serving party leader, denies any role in the outlawed IRA.

Sinn Fein, the major Irish nationalist party in Northern Ireland, has accused Protestant leaders of pressuring police to arrest Adams now to undermine Sinn Fein before elections this month in both Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, where Adams leads Sinn Fein in the Irish parliament.

Robinson appealed to McConville's children to tell police the identities of the IRA members who stormed into their home in the Divis Flats welfare housing project just before Christmas 1972 . He said Sinn Fein should encourage them to come forward, free from fear of IRA retaliation.


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