BEIRUT

Lebanon News

Hezbollah commander killed in Iraq

The son of Ibrahim al-Hajj, a Hezbollah commander who died during a mission in Iraq, wears a military outfit as he lies on his father's coffin during his funeral in Mashghara village in the Bekaa Valley. (REUTERS/Shawky Hajj)

BEIRUT: A Hezbollah commander was recently killed while on a “jihadi mission” in Iraq, officials in Lebanon said Thursday.

The officials, who are close to Hezbollah, said Ibrahim Mohammad al-Hajj was killed sometime in the past week.

They did not provide any details on his mission or circumstances of his death and spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to media.

It was the first known Hezbollah death in Iraq since Sunni extremists with ISIS captured large parts of the country north and west of Baghdad in June.

Iraqi officials have said that a handful of advisers from Hezbollah are offering front-line guidance to Iraqi Shiite militias fighting the Sunni extremists north of Baghdad. But it is not known if – beyond the advisers – any Hezbollah fighters are battling alongside Iraqi Shiite militiamen.

Last year, Hezbollah fighters openly joined Syrian President Bashar Assad’s forces in a decision that has fueled sectarian tensions in Lebanon.

Hezbollah’s Al-Manar TV aired footage Thursday of Hajj’s funeral that was held in the Western Bekaa town of Mashgara Wednesday. The funeral was attended by top Hezbollah officials, including the head of the group’s parliamentary bloc Mohammad Raad and Industry Minister Hussein Hajj Hasan.

Al-Manar referred to Hajj as “commander,” saying he died while “performing his jihadi duties” – a term used by the group when its members are killed in action.

Hajj’s coffin, draped in the group’s yellow flag, was carried by Hezbollah fighters in uniform who walked on a red carpet as a band played music.

In July 2006, Hajj was among a group of Hezbollah fighters who crossed into Israel and captured two Israeli soldiers and brought them into Lebanon, Lebanese security officials told the Associated Press. They spoke on condition of anonymity in line with regulations.

The capture triggered a 34-day war between Israel and Hezbollah that left 160 Israelis and 1,200 Lebanese dead.

Al-Manar said Hajj’s achievements on the battlefield had “pained the enemy,” referring to Israel.

He was the second Hezbollah commander to be killed abroad in recent months.

In May, Fawzi Ayoub, a Hezbollah military commander wanted by the FBI, was killed in Syria while fighting alongside Assad’s forces.

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on August 01, 2014, on page 3.

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Summary

A Hezbollah commander was recently killed while on a "jihadi mission" in Iraq, officials in Lebanon said Thursday.

It is not known if – beyond the advisers – any Hezbollah fighters are battling alongside Iraqi Shiite militiamen.

In July 2006, Hajj was among a group of Hezbollah fighters who crossed into Israel and captured two Israeli soldiers and brought them into Lebanon, Lebanese security officials told the Associated Press.

Al-Manar said Hajj's achievements on the battlefield had "pained the enemy," referring to Israel.

He was the second Hezbollah commander to be killed abroad in recent months.


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