BEIRUT

Middle East

Mubarak spy chief attacks Brothers over presidency

Supporters of former Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman chant in front of his posters out side the Higher Presidential Elections Commission, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, April 8, 2012. A former strongman of ousted President Hosni Mubarak's regime has announced his presidential candidacy, shaking up an already heated race that is emerging as a contest between two longtime rivals _ former regime officials and Islamists who have surged in influence. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

CAIRO: Former spymaster Omar Suleiman lashed out at the Muslim Brotherhood and said his own candidacy for the presidency aimed to restore security and stability in Egypt, in an interview published Monday.

The Brotherhood, which dominates parliament and is heavily tipped for the presidency, has "lost a lot of its popularity," said Suleiman, who was military intelligence chief under ousted president Hosni Mubarak.

"There has been a change on the Egyptian street. The practises of the Brotherhood and their monopolistic ways and unacceptable pronouncements have contributed to the change in public opinion," he said.

Suleiman, a sworn enemy of Islamists before last year's revolution which brought down Mubarak, vowed not to drop out of the May 23-24 election despite alleged threats from Islamists.

"Ever since the announcement that I was running, I have received on my mobile and through friends threats and messages that 'We will take our revenge' from elements of the Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamist groups," he said.

"If some people think such threats will make me go back on his decision, they are mistaken," said Suleiman.

The former general played down his links with the ousted regime or with the military which has been ruling Egypt in the interim since Mubarak's fall.

"If I was intelligence chief and then vice president for a few days, that doesn't mean I was part of a regime against which the people mounted a revolt," he said.

"The revolution has created a new reality and noone can bring back a regime which has fallen and which the population has rejected," he said.

"I am counting on the little people, on the young and on intellectuals. I am counting on those who want security and stability, who want to be able to earn a living in dignity and freedom," he said.

Suleiman said he could "save the country from its chaos" by restoring security and attracting foreign investors to return to Egypt.

Registration for candidates in Egypt's first post-uprising presidential election closed on Sunday, amid last-minute twists and turns that have shaken the political race.

The candidates include former Arab League chief Amr Mussa, ultra-conservative Islamist preacher Hazem Abu Ismail, the Brotherhood's Khairat El-Shater, as well as Suleiman who registered less than half an hour before the deadline.

 

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