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U.S. seeks to boost Algeria in Al-Qaeda fight

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry waters a tree that he planted during a tree planting ceremony with Algerian Foreign Minister Ramtane Lamamra (centre R) at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs during a U.S.-Algeria Strategic Dialogue in Algiers April 3, 2014. (REUTERS/Jacquelyn Martin)

ALGIERS: U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Thursday that Washington was looking to increase its security assistance to Algeria to help it tackle militancy in the vast Sahel region to its south, home to one of the world’s most active branches of Al-Qaeda.

Algeria, a major gas supplier to Europe, is already a key partner in Washington’s campaign against Islamist fighters who have tried to spread across the Maghreb after the French military drove them out of Mali last year.

Kerry was originally scheduled to visit Algeria late last year but arrived just weeks before President Abdelaziz Bouteflika runs for re-election.

Bouteflika is expected to easily win another five-year term after 15 years in power in the vote on April 17, despite concerns over his health since suffering a stroke last year.

Some in the Algerian opposition described the timing of Kerry’s visit as odd, saying it was an indirect statement of support to Bouteflika’s election bid.

“We look forward to elections that are transparent and in line with international standards, and the United States will work with the president that the people of Algeria choose,” Kerry told a news conference. “We really want to work in a cooperative way, and we want to do this so that Algerian security services have the tools and the training needed in order to defeat Al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups.”

Algeria’s Foreign Minister Ramtane Lamamra said the United States should give the region more access to its intelligence.

“What the U.S. can do, because nobody else can do it, is for instance, share electronic intelligence with the armed forces and security agencies in the region. This is a qualitative edge that only the U.S. can provide,” he said.

Neighboring Libya is struggling to curb the turmoil that has continued unabated since the 2011 revolt against Moammar Gadhafi. Islamist fighters have exploited the chaos, taking shelter in Libya’s southern deserts but also in remote mountains in Tunisia.

Attacks in Algeria are rare since the country ended an 11-year conflict with Islamists in 2002, but the risks are still high. Last year, Al-Qaeda fighters raided a gas plant in the Algerian southern desert, killing 40 oil workers, all but one of whom were foreigners.

Kerry also said the United States would do more to build stronger commercial and investment ties between the countries.

The official said large-scale youth unemployment in Algeria was troubling and that greater investment would help bolster job creation.

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on April 04, 2014, on page 9.

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Summary

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Thursday that Washington was looking to increase its security assistance to Algeria to help it tackle militancy in the vast Sahel region to its south, home to one of the world's most active branches of Al-Qaeda.

Kerry was originally scheduled to visit Algeria late last year but arrived just weeks before President Abdelaziz Bouteflika runs for re-election.

Algeria's Foreign Minister Ramtane Lamamra said the United States should give the region more access to its intelligence.

Attacks in Algeria are rare since the country ended an 11-year conflict with Islamists in 2002, but the risks are still high.


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