BEIRUT

Middle East

Iraqi and Kurdish officials welcome US airdrops

Fire fighters look for survivors at the site of a double car bomb attack took place in Kirkuk, 290 kilometers north of Baghdad August 7, 2014. (AP Photo)

BAGHDAD: Iraqi and Kurdish officials have welcomed the U.S. decision to authorize airdrops of humanitarian aid and airstrikes in northern Iraq to counter advancing Sunni radical militants.

A string of victories across the north of the country by the radical Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS) group and their allies have sent Iraq's minorities fleeing for their lives, exacerbating the country's already-dire humanitarian crisis with another 200,000 displaced.

"We thank Barack Obama," said Khaled Jamal Alber, of the Ministry of Religious Affairs for the Kurdish autonomous region of northern Iraq. "Kurdistan is the place for religious minorities."

Iraq's Ministry of the Displaced also welcomed the aid drops.

The announcements by President Obama reflected the deepest American engagement in Iraq since U.S. troops withdrew in late 2011 after nearly a decade of war.

 

Recommended

Advertisement

Comments

Your feedback is important to us!

We invite all our readers to share with us their views and comments about this article.

Disclaimer: Comments submitted by third parties on this site are the sole responsibility of the individual(s) whose content is submitted. The Daily Star accepts no responsibility for the content of comment(s), including, without limitation, any error, omission or inaccuracy therein. Please note that your email address will NOT appear on the site.

Alert: If you are facing problems with posting comments, please note that you must verify your email with Disqus prior to posting a comment. follow this link to make sure your account meets the requirements. (http://bit.ly/vDisqus)

comments powered by Disqus

Advertisement

FOLLOW THIS ARTICLE

Interested in knowing more about this story?

Click here