BEIRUT

Middle East

Iran says tested new nuclear enrichment machine

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Yukiya Amano talks to the media as he arrives at Vienna's airport August 18, 2014. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader

DUBAI/VIENNA: Iran has conducted “mechanical” tests on a new, advanced machine to refine uranium, a senior official was quoted as saying Wednesday, a disclosure that may annoy Western states pushing Tehran to scale back its nuclear program.

Iran’s development of new centrifuges to replace its current breakdown-prone model is watched closely by Western officials. It could allow Tehran to amass potential atomic bomb material much faster.

The Islamic Republic says its nuclear program is peaceful and that it produces low-enriched uranium only to make fuel for a network of atomic energy plants. If processed to a high fissile concentration, uranium can be used for nuclear weapons.

“Manufacturing and production of new centrifuges is our right,” Iranian atomic energy chief Ali Akbar Salehi said.

Iran’s Fars news agency also quoted him as saying that Iran had tested its latest generation of centrifuge, the IR-8, but had not yet fed it with uranium gas.

U.N. nuclear agency reports this year showed Iran testing four other models under development at an above-ground Natanz nuclear site – IR-2m, IR-4, IR-6 and IR-6s – with such gas.

The Islamic Republic had informed the U.N. International Atomic Energy Agency in December that it planned to install a single IR-8. The IAEA said in May that it had observed a new “casing” at the site, but that it was not yet connected.

An interim accord struck late last year in Geneva between Iran and six world powers stipulated that Iran could not go beyond the centrifuge research and development it has been conducting at the Natanz site, including testing of new models.

It was one of the thorniest issues to settle in technical talks on how to implement the preliminary deal.

In a comment that Western officials may dispute, Salehi said that “based on the Geneva agreement, research and development have no limit,” Fars reported.

Salehi said Iran had “introduced” the IR-8 centrifuge to the IAEA. “Mechanical tests have been done but gas has yet to be injected.” That would require President Hassan Rouhani’s permission.

The comments reported by Fars did not make clear when the tests were carried out.

Faced with technical hurdles and difficulty in obtaining parts abroad, Iran has been trying for years to replace the erratic, 1970s vintage IR-1 centrifuge it now operates at its underground Natanz and Fordow uranium enrichment facilities.

Although Iran’s progress so far seems limited, it is an issue that Western states will want to see addressed as part of any final settlement over Iran’s nuclear program.

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on August 28, 2014, on page 10.

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Summary

Iran has conducted "mechanical" tests on a new, advanced machine to refine uranium, a senior official was quoted as saying Wednesday, a disclosure that may annoy Western states pushing Tehran to scale back its nuclear program.

Iran's Fars news agency also quoted him as saying that Iran had tested its latest generation of centrifuge, the IR-8, but had not yet fed it with uranium gas.

An interim accord struck late last year in Geneva between Iran and six world powers stipulated that Iran could not go beyond the centrifuge research and development it has been conducting at the Natanz site, including testing of new models.

Although Iran's progress so far seems limited, it is an issue that Western states will want to see addressed as part of any final settlement over Iran's nuclear program.


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