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FRIDAY, 18 APR 2014
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Low-level conflict afflicts Bahrain on third uprising anniversary
Reuters
Bahraini youths jump rope as they wait for riot police between clashes on the main street of Malkiya, Bahrain, Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)
Bahraini youths jump rope as they wait for riot police between clashes on the main street of Malkiya, Bahrain, Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)
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MANAMA: Three years after the eruption of a popular uprising in Bahrain that security forces subdued but have failed to stamp out, the ruling family has launched a new dialogue with the opposition but a breakthrough to end the turmoil remains elusive. 

Bahrain’s fellow conservative Gulf Arab states and the West have high stakes in the stability of the island monarchy because it hosts the U.S. Fifth Fleet and lies at the heart of a tussle for regional influence between Shiite Iran and Sunni powerhouse and world No. 1 oil producer Saudi Arabia.

But Bahrain seems trapped in a treadmill of recrimination and low-level but chronic political conflict on the third anniversary of the Feb. 14 uprising spearheaded by majority Shiites seeking democratic reform and an end to alleged discrimination at the hands of the Sunni monarchy.

The standoff is played out in street protest almost daily.

Young men staged small rallies around the capital Manama in the run-up to Friday’s anniversary, blocking roads with metal bars, garbage containers and cinder blocks to keep security force out of Shiite villages, witnesses said.

“After three years since the start of the protests, we have seen no peace,” said a 34-year-old clerk in the village of Saar who identified himself only as Abu Ali. “Every day there is a problem in our area. The youngsters go out and burn tires on the roads and the police attack them with tear gas.”

Two rounds of reconciliation-oriented dialogue between the opposition and government since 2011 ended inconclusively, and Bahrainis are now banking on a new attempt backed by Crown Prince Sheikh Salman bin Hamad al-Khalifa to revive the talks.

Crown Prince Sheikh Salman, a relative moderate in the Sunni Khalifa family that has ruled Bahrain since the 18th century, stepped in last month to try to narrow differences – four months after the second round of reconciliation talks was suspended in the face of an opposition boycott.

Several meetings have since been held between the Royal Court Minister Sheikh Khaled bin Ahmad al-Khalifa and opposition leaders to try to pave the way for formal talks to resume.

Further sessions are expected but it is not known when, and analysts cite little sign of preparedness on either side to bridge the major substantive differences, as has been the case from the outset of the crisis.

“Each of the country’s three main political conflicts – opposition versus government, Sunnis versus Shiites and reformists versus obstructionists within the ruling family – continues unabated,” said Justin Gengler, a Bahrain expert at Qatar University in Doha. 

Concern is rising that young Shiites will resort more and more to violent militancy if mainstream opposition leaders fail to advance a political settlement that would give Shiites a bigger say in government and improve living conditions.

A tiny Gulf archipelago of 1.7 million people, Bahrain has been in turmoil since police, assisted by invited Saudi armed forces, crushed the original uprising.

The government says it has since implemented some reforms recommended by an international investigative team and that is willing to discuss further demands.

Shiites want wider-ranging democratization, entailing Cabinets chosen by an elected parliament, rather than appointed exclusively by the king. They also call for an end to alleged discrimination in jobs, housing and other benefits. The government denies any policy of marginalizing Shiites.

The leader of the main opposition movement, Al-Wefaq, Sheikh Ali Salman blamed what he called the authorities’ ultimate preference for security crackdowns over a genuine political opening for the stalemate dragging on.

“This is the third year of the revolution. Had wisdom been used by the government, there wouldn’t be a popular revolution and a political solution would have been reached in the first few months,” Sheikh Ali told Reuters.

“But by choosing the security option, we have entered the fourth year.”

Information Minister Samira Rajab said: 

“The claims of terrorists that there is a revolution in Bahrain are all lies. Bahrainis are practicing their normal lives.”

Umm Abdallah, a 42-year-old secretary from Isa town, said it was high time for both parties to knuckle down and produce a solution beneficial to all in Bahrain.

“I have to say that both the government and the opposition are wrong. The government should have shown more effort and sincerity in their steps toward dialogue and the opposition should have stopped terrorizing innocent citizens.” 

 
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Story Summary
Three years after the eruption of a popular uprising in Bahrain that security forces subdued but have failed to stamp out, the ruling family has launched a new dialogue with the opposition but a breakthrough to end the turmoil remains elusive.

Bahrain seems trapped in a treadmill of recrimination and low-level but chronic political conflict on the third anniversary of the Feb. 14 uprising spearheaded by majority Shiites seeking democratic reform and an end to alleged discrimination at the hands of the Sunni monarchy.

Two rounds of reconciliation-oriented dialogue between the opposition and government since 2011 ended inconclusively, and Bahrainis are now banking on a new attempt backed by Crown Prince Sheikh Salman bin Hamad al-Khalifa to revive the talks.

Crown Prince Sheikh Salman, a relative moderate in the Sunni Khalifa family that has ruled Bahrain since the 18th century, stepped in last month to try to narrow differences – four months after the second round of reconciliation talks was suspended in the face of an opposition boycott.
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