BEIRUT

Middle East

Paris: Chlorine samples may be inconclusive

File - Citizen journalism image provided by the Local Committee of Arbeen which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, members of the UN investigation team take samples from the ground in the Damascus countryside of Zamalka, Syria, Aug. 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Local Committee of Arbeen)

PARIS: France said Thursday samples it had collected suggesting Syrian government forces had used chlorine gas in the country’s civil war may not prove to be conclusive and would need to be cross-checked with other information to determine its use.

The Organization for the Prevention of Chemical Weapons has opened an investigation into the alleged chlorine attacks, more than a dozen of which have been reported since April 11 in several areas.

France, one of Assad’s fiercest critics, was the first Western power to provide non-lethal military aid to rebels. It has been a vocal critic of United States policy on Syria since President Barack Obama backed down from launching airstrikes following suspected chemical attacks last year.

In a briefing to reporters, French Foreign Ministry spokesman Romain Nadal said Paris, which has been examining about 14 samples for several weeks, would continue to do so in coordination with other nations.

“Given that ... chlorine which is widely used for civilian purposes, is very volatile, the results of the analysis may not necessarily prove to be conclusive, [and] will need to be complemented with other information,” Nadal said.

A French diplomatic source said among complementary information being studied was communication between Syrian officials, pieces of debris suspected to have been used in launching chlorine gas and medical evidence from people reported to have been affected by a gas.

“If there is no smoking gun, you need to put all the pieces of the puzzle together,” said the source, adding that Paris was working with its main allies U.S. and Britain on building an exact picture of what happened.

Another alleged chlorine attack took place on May 22. the day Russia and China vetoed a French-drafted resolution to refer the situation in Syria to the International Criminal Court for possible prosecution of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Chlorine is likely to be less lethal than sarin but its use as a weapon is illegal under a global chemical weapons convention signed by Syria.

Its use would also breach the terms of a deal last year between Washington and Moscow, itself now weeks behind schedule, aimed at ridding Syria of its chemical arsenal.

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on June 06, 2014, on page 8.

Recommended

Advertisement

Comments

Your feedback is important to us!

We invite all our readers to share with us their views and comments about this article.

Disclaimer: Comments submitted by third parties on this site are the sole responsibility of the individual(s) whose content is submitted. The Daily Star accepts no responsibility for the content of comment(s), including, without limitation, any error, omission or inaccuracy therein. Please note that your email address will NOT appear on the site.

Alert: If you are facing problems with posting comments, please note that you must verify your email with Disqus prior to posting a comment. follow this link to make sure your account meets the requirements. (http://bit.ly/vDisqus)

comments powered by Disqus
Summary

France said Thursday samples it had collected suggesting Syrian government forces had used chlorine gas in the country's civil war may not prove to be conclusive and would need to be cross-checked with other information to determine its use.

A French diplomatic source said among complementary information being studied was communication between Syrian officials, pieces of debris suspected to have been used in launching chlorine gas and medical evidence from people reported to have been affected by a gas.

Another alleged chlorine attack took place on May 22 .


Advertisement

FOLLOW THIS ARTICLE

Interested in knowing more about this story?

Click here