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Middle East

Race against the clock for Tehran nuclear talks

European Union Foreign Policy Chief Catherine Ashton (L) and Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif smile as they wait for the begin of talks in Vienna June 17, 2014. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader

VIENNA: Negotiators from Iran and six world powers sought Tuesday to overcome major differences and hammer out the text of a momentous nuclear deal just five weeks before a deadline.

This hugely complex accord would see the Islamic Republic scale down its nuclear program to ease concerns that it wants atomic weapons – something the country has long denied.

In return, Iran is demanding the lifting of all U.N. and Western sanctions that are hitting its oil exports, clogging up its financial system and causing major economic problems.

Such a deal is aimed at resolving one of the trickiest geopolitical problems of the 21st century after a decade of rising tensions, threats of war – and of nuclear expansion by Tehran.

There was little indication whether the sides had moved toward overcoming the deadlock in their session Tuesday. But a spokesman for EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said talks focused on “elements of text that could be part of the final agreement.”

“We are certainly very realistic,” he told reporters. “And we hope the Iranian side is as well. ... I think things are moving forward.”

Talks are scheduled to last until Friday and resume some time next month before the July 20 deadline.

“The negotiations have already intensified, as we said that they would, and they will continue to do so in the days and weeks leading up to July 20,” a senior U.S. official said Monday on the first day of talks in Vienna.

She added however that there are “still significant gaps ... and we don’t have illusions about how hard it will be to close those gaps, though we do see ways to do so.”

The many problem areas include the duration of any final accord, the pace of sanctions relief, Iran’s partially built Arak nuclear reactor and allegations of past efforts to build a bomb.

But the main sticking point remains, as it has been for years, uranium enrichment: a process that can produce nuclear fuel but also, when highly purified, the core of an atomic bomb.

The West hotly disputes Iran’s claim that it needs this material for civilian nuclear facilities, saying it only has one power plant – fuelled by Russia – and that others are years from completion.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said last week that Iran should slash the number of centrifuges, machines that enrich by spinning uranium gas at supersonic speeds, to “several hundred.”

But Iran, which has 20,000 centrifuges, 10,000 of them spinning, is believed to want to massively increase its capacities. It is also developing newer, faster machines.

“We are not even in the same ballpark,” Fabius said.

The parties have set themselves a deadline of July 20, when an interim deal struck in November expires, and many experts believe an extension is already being talked about.

The senior U.S. official denied any such discussion, however, indicating some progress in bilateral U.S.-Iranian talks in Geneva last Monday and Tuesday.

“We not only understood each other better after those two days, but I think we both can see places where we might be able to close those gaps,” she said.

The United States and Iran Monday briefly diverted from the nuclear talks to discuss the crisis raging in Iraq, U.S. officials said.

Trita Parsi, president of the National Iranian American Council, said the crisis “adds urgency” to securing a nuclear deal because it would make it easier to “explore regional areas of mutual interest.”

But whether any sharing of interests or even U.S.-Iranian cooperation in Iraq could help get a nuclear agreement remains to be seen.

“I expect tactical cooperation over Iraq to have as much impact on the nuclear talks as the tactical disagreement over Syria,” Ali Vaez of the International Crisis Group said.

“Which means not much.”

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on June 18, 2014, on page 10.

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Summary

Negotiators from Iran and six world powers sought Tuesday to overcome major differences and hammer out the text of a momentous nuclear deal just five weeks before a deadline.

Talks are scheduled to last until Friday and resume some time next month before the July 20 deadline.

Iran, which has 20,000 centrifuges, 10,000 of them spinning, is believed to want to massively increase its capacities.

The senior U.S. official denied any such discussion, however, indicating some progress in bilateral U.S.-Iranian talks in Geneva last Monday and Tuesday.

The United States and Iran Monday briefly diverted from the nuclear talks to discuss the crisis raging in Iraq, U.S. officials said.

Whether any sharing of interests or even U.S.-Iranian cooperation in Iraq could help get a nuclear agreement remains to be seen.


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