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War crimes evidence in Syria solid enough for indictment: UN

Faysal Khabbaz Hamoui, Ambassador of the Permanent Representative Mission of Syria to Geneva, listens to a speech, during a session of the Human Rights Council on the report of the Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in Syria at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Keystone, Salvatore Di Nolfi)

GENEVA: United Nations human rights investigators have added to their list of suspected war criminals from both sides in the Syrian civil war after a new round of atrocities in recent weeks, the head of the inquiry said Tuesday.

The U.N. inquiry has identified military units and security agencies as well as insurgent groups suspected of committing abuses, Paulo Pinheiro told the Human Rights Council.

Four confidential lists of suspects on both sides have been drawn up.

“This ‘perpetrators list,’ as we call it, contains names of persons criminally responsible for hostage taking, torture and executions,” said Pinheiro, a Brazilian. 

“It also contains names of the heads of intelligence branches and detention facilities where detainees are tortured, names of military commanders who target civilians, airports from which barrel bomb attacks are planned and executed, and armed groups involved in attacking and displacing civilians.”

 

“We have an enormous volume of testimony – over 2,700 interviews, as well as a wealth of documentary material,” Pinheiro told the council. “We do not lack information on crimes or on perpetrators. What we lack is a means by which to achieve justice and accountability.”

In its update report, the U.N. commission of inquiry on Syria said the period of Jan. 20 to March 10 was marked by escalating hostilities between insurgent groups throughout northern and northeastern provinces as Islamist rebel strongholds came under attack.

Regime forces have dropped barrel bombs on Aleppo and other cities, causing extensive civilian casualties in areas with no clear military target, and severely tortured detainees.

Fighters from Al-Qaeda splinter group the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria, also known as ISIS, executed detainees, including civilians and captured soldiers, in Aleppo, Idlib and Raqqa in the hours and days before coming under attack by other armed groups such as the Islamic Front, it said.

ISIS used the Children’s Hospital building in Aleppo as its headquarters and as a detention facility. Later, fighters from another group discovered an “execution field” near the hospital.

“In the days and hours prior to attack, ISIS fighters conducted mass executions of detainees, thereby perpetrating war crimes. The number killed as well as allegations of mass graves connected to these executions remain under investigation,” it said.

The independent team of more than 20 investigators, set up in Sept. 2011, months after the start of the revolt now in its fourth year, includes former U.N. war crimes prosecutor Carla del Ponte. 

It has called repeatedly for the Security Council to refer the situation in Syria to the International Criminal Court, a call endorsed again Tuesday by Britain, the European Union, France and Switzerland.

“It is this volume of testimony that will be the enduring legacy of the commission: an archive of Syrian voices and a resource for future prosecutions,” Pinheiro said.

Syrian Ambassador Faysal Hamawi took the floor to denounce the commission.

“Referral to the ICC is a politicized and unlawful step as there are national judicial mechanisms available in Syria,” he said. 

He accused the commission of working for the political agendas of countries that are supporting the rebels – naming the United States, Qatar, Turkey and Saudi Arabia.

Iran, which supports Assad, condemned extreme violence committed by “terrorist and extremist groups” in Syria. The Iranian delegation said the move to refer its ally to the ICC constituted “highly politicized and illegitimate incitement.”

Pinheiro said countries were under an obligation not to supply weapons to places where they might be used to commit war crimes.

“Our reports document these crimes,” he said. “No one can claim ignorance of what is occurring in Syria.”

 

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Summary

United Nations human rights investigators have added to their list of suspected war criminals from both sides in the Syrian civil war after a new round of atrocities in recent weeks, the head of the inquiry said Tuesday.

The U.N. inquiry has identified military units and security agencies as well as insurgent groups suspected of committing abuses, Paulo Pinheiro told the Human Rights Council.

In its update report, the U.N. commission of inquiry on Syria said the period of Jan. 20 to March 10 was marked by escalating hostilities between insurgent groups throughout northern and northeastern provinces as Islamist rebel strongholds came under attack.

Fighters from Al-Qaeda splinter group the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria, also known as ISIS, executed detainees, including civilians and captured soldiers, in Aleppo, Idlib and Raqqa in the hours and days before coming under attack by other armed groups such as the Islamic Front, it said.


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