BEIRUT

Middle East

Iraq attacks kill 38 as 2014 death toll tops 4,000

Debris lays strewn at the site of a bomb attack inside a Shi'ite mosque in Baghdad May 27, 2014. The attack by a suicide bomber killed 19 people and wounded 36, police sources said. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani

BAGHDAD: Attacks across Iraq killed 38 people Wednesday, the latest in a monthslong surge in violence that has left more than 4,000 people dead this year.

The shootings and bombings struck in Baghdad and restive parts of the north and west, leaving dozens more wounded, security and medical officials said.

Three other car bombs went off in the Amin, Sadr City and Jihad districts, killing eight more people.

The blasts were the latest in a trend of militants setting off vehicles rigged with explosives during the evening, when Baghdad’s residents visit markets, restaurants and cafes.

Previously, such attacks had typically been timed to go off during morning rush hour.

Elsewhere in and around the capital, gun attacks and explosions killed three people, officials said.

No group immediately claimed responsibility, but Sunni militants including those linked to the jihadist Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria often set off coordinated bombings across Baghdad, ostensibly in a bid to sow instability.

Also in north Iraq, a series of 11 bombings in the ethnically mixed town of Tuz Khurmatu killed five people, four of them members of the same family, and wounded 11.

The blasts targeted homes belonging to ethnic Turkmen. The town, also populated by Arabs and Kurds, lies in a stretch of territory that Kurdish leaders want to incorporate into their autonomous region over the objections of the central government.

Insurgents often exploit poor communication between Arab and Kurdish security forces to carry out attacks in the area.

Shelling in the militant-held city of Fallujah, a short drive west of Baghdad, killed three more people, a day after Human Rights Watch criticized the government for possibly violating the laws of war by shelling the city’s main hospital.

Security forces have shelled Fallujah repeatedly for several months. They insist they are targeting militant hideouts, but human rights groups and residents say civilians are bearing the brunt of the bombardment. 

 

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Summary

Attacks across Iraq killed 38 people Wednesday, the latest in a monthslong surge in violence that has left more than 4,000 people dead this year.

Three other car bombs went off in the Amin, Sadr City and Jihad districts, killing eight more people.

Previously, such attacks had typically been timed to go off during morning rush hour.

In north Iraq, a series of 11 bombings in the ethnically mixed town of Tuz Khurmatu killed five people, four of them members of the same family, and wounded 11 .


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