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Lebanon News

U.N. condemns Syrian incursions into Lebanon

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon speaks to reporters during a joint news conference with Secretary of State John Kerry, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013, at the State Department in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

BEIRUT: United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon urged Syria to end its incursions into Lebanon and voiced concern over the involvement of some Lebanese groups in the neighboring country’s conflict, in a report to the Security Council.

“I call upon the government of Syria to cease all violations of the border and to respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Lebanon,” Ban said in the 21st edition of the report into the implementation of Resolution 1701, an advance copy of which was obtained by The Daily Star.

The U.N. chief’s report on Resolution 1701 and the commitment of both Lebanon and Israel in maintaining calm along the Blue Line will be discussed by the Security Council later in March.

Since the start of the conflict in neighboring Syria, cross-border shelling has claimed the lives of many Lebanese citizens and caused the country material damage.

In the report which covers the period between Oct. 30 2012 and Feb. 28 2013, Ban condemned the involvement of some Lebanese elements in Syria violence and arms smuggling to the neighboring country and warned of “serious challenges” to Lebanon’s security in light of the ongoing Syrian crisis.

“The dangers for Lebanon of such involvement and indeed of continued cross-border arms smuggling are obvious,” he said.

Mentioning the late November killing of Lebanese nationals in an ambush by the Syrian army in the border town of Tal Kalakh, as well as reports of Hezbollah members fighting inside Syria, Ban urged commitment to the country’s policy of dissociation from the crisis in the war torn country.

“I call upon all Lebanese political leaders to act to ensure that Lebanon remains neutral in respect of external conflicts consistent with their commitment in the Baabda Declaration,” said Ban, in reference to an agreement by rival Lebanese leaders to keep the country neutral in regards to regional developments.

In the 17-page document, Ban said that major obligations outlined in U.N. Resolution 1701 are still “outstanding,” indicating that illegal arms are still present in south Lebanon, a Hezbollah stronghold, where the United Nations Interim Forces in Lebanon operate.

The U.N. recorded two attempts to launch rockets from Lebanon to Israel during the latest November weeklong conflict between Israel and Hamas in Gaza, the report said. Ban also voiced concern over a large explosion that rocked the southern Lebanese town of Tair Harfa in December.

As for Lebanon’s political situation, Ban said the uncertain security situation in Lebanon has led the country to a “political stalemate” and affected the expected parliamentary elections scheduled for June 9, stressing that the polls must be held on time.

“I am concerned that disagreements over the electoral law have overshadowed necessary preparations for the elections,” Ban said.

“I encourage all parties in Lebanon to work to ensure that elections take place on a consensual basis within the legal constitutional timeframe.”

In his report, Ban also told the U.N. that Lebanon is facing “increasing challenges” with the influx of Syrian refugees to the country and asked for Lebanon to be provided with the funds pledged earlier this year by the international community to assist the country in hosting Syrians fleeing violence.

“Quick delivery of these pledges is a key priority now if the suffering of the refugees is to be alleviated and if Lebanon is to sustain its capacity to address increased numbers of refugees at the current rates of influx,” Ban said.

In a conference in Kuwait on Jan. 30, Lebanon appealed to the Arab League and the international donor community for some $200 million to help the government cope with a rising number of Syrian refugees in Lebanon, which has reached over 300,000 refugees, a number expected to increase to more than half a million by this summer.

Ban also hailed the president’s effort in bringing together Lebanese parties over a national defense strategy and urged Lebanese politicians to return to the dialogue table following the crisis sparked by the assassination of a senior security official Brig. Gen. Wissam al-Hasan.

The U.N. chief also said that the Oct. 19 killing of Hasan should not go unpunished, nor should other assassination attempts, so as to spare politicians from living amid death threats.

Ban said the National Dialogue would be the “best mechanism” to ensure an agreement would be reached on ensuring arms were kept within the Lebanese state.

He cited repeated security incidents in the northern city of Tripoli, saying that the recurrence of armed clashes “underlines the extent to which Lebanon needs to take further concrete steps to counter the prevalence of weapons outside the authority of the state.”

Ban also voiced concern over some “aggressive behavior towards UNIFIL personnel,” but added that the number of incidents between southern residents and soldiers operating in the international troops is “marginal.”

He also hailed the efforts by the Lebanese Army in light of rising security challenges in the country and the region and said the Army has “for the first time, at the prompting of the Lebanese government, sought to prioritize strategically its immediate needs in light of those multiple challenges.”

In his previous report issued last year, Ban also stressed the need for commitment to dissociation from events in Syria and hailed President Sleiman’s efforts to resume Dialogue, reiterating that Hezbollah and other group’s continued possession of arms outside state control violates Resolutions 1559 and 1701.

 

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