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Scientist finds rare ‘headless’ ladybug
Reuters
A newly discovered ladybug is seen in this undated handout photo courtesy of Montana State University. (REUTERS/Montana State University/HO)
A newly discovered ladybug is seen in this undated handout photo courtesy of Montana State University. (REUTERS/Montana State University/HO)
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SALMON, Idaho: Sleepy Hollow has its headless horseman and now Montana has a headless ladybug.

The newly discovered insect tucks its head into its throat – making it not only a new species but an entirely new genus, or larger classification of plants and animals.

Ross Winton captured the insect in 2009 with traps he set in a sand dune while studying at Montana State University. Winton, now a wildlife technician in Idaho, at first thought he had parts of an ant but then discovered the bug can hide its head, much like a turtle ducking into its shell.

Winton sent his discovery to scientists in Australia working on this group of insects and the headless ladybug was formally described in a recent issue of the journal Systemic Entomology.

Only two specimens of the tan, pinhead-sized ladybugs have ever been collected, scientists said, making it the rarest species in the U.S.

Entomologists historically used males to describe beetle species so the credit for the new discovery went to Winton.

However, the new species – Allenius iviei – was named after his former professor and Montana State University entomologist Michael Ivie.

The insect, with the proposed common name “Winton’s Ladybird Beetle,” may prey on aphids and other plant pests.

Ivie said it was rare to discover a new beetle in the U.S., and rarer still to uncover a completely new genus. He added it was unclear why the beetle slips its head into a tube in its midsection.

“It’s a whole new kind of ladybug,” Ivie said. “It’s quite the exciting little beast.”

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on October 26, 2012, on page 13.
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