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British Ebola victim flown back from Sierra Leone for treatment

A poster warns of the dangers of the Ebola virus in Abidjan. AFP PHOTO / SIA KAMBOU

FREETOWN/LONDON: A British health care worker who contracted Ebola in Sierra Leone – the first Briton to catch the deadly virus – was flown home for treatment on Sunday, as the World Health Organization confirmed another foreign medic had caught the disease. Britain’s Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond authorized the repatriation of the male medical worker – whose identity has not been disclosed – after he was analyzed by doctors from Britain and Sierra Leone.

The worst ever outbreak of the hemorrhagic fever has so far killed at least 1,427 people, mostly in Sierra Leone, Liberia and neighboring Guinea. Five deaths have been reported in Nigeria.

Britain’s Deputy Chief Medical Officer John Watson said final approval for the evacuation was given on the ground in Sierra Leone by a team of physicians who had arrived on a specially equipped Royal Air Force cargo plane.

The Boeing C-17 left the Sierra Leonean capital Freetown bound for Britain at around 1250 GMT.

“We understand that this patient, during the course of the work that he was carrying out, was exposed about a week ago and became unwell two or three days ago,” Watson told Sky News.

“The patient is not currently seriously unwell,” the U.K. Department of Health said in a statement.

Upon arrival at the RAF Northolt air base in Britain, he will be transported to an isolation unit at the Royal Free Hospital in London, the department said.

The hospital has the only high-level isolation unit for treatment of infectious diseases in Britain and has a team of specially trained staff.

Two U.S. doctors, who contracted Ebola in Liberia and were evacuated to the United States, left hospital last week after receiving treatment with an experimental drug, ZMapp. It was not clear what role the pharmaceutical played in their recovery.

Three African health care workers have also improved since receiving ZMapp in Liberia. Its U.S.-based manufacturer, Mapp Biopharmaceutical, has said limited supplies of the drug have already been exhausted.

The World Health Organization said one of its health care workers had tested positive for Ebola for the first time in Sierra Leone. The WHO said it was working to ensure that the foreign worker, who it did not identify, was receiving the best possible care, including the option of medical evacuation.

A government source in Sierra Leone, who asked not to be identified, said the worker was a Senegalese expert working for the WHO in the eastern town of Kailahun.

The WHO has deployed nearly 400 people from its own staff and partner organizations since the outbreak was detected in March deep in the forest region of southeast Guinea.

In the past six months, more than 225 health workers have fallen ill and nearly 130 have lost their lives to the disease, the WHO said.

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on August 25, 2014, on page 11.

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Summary

A British health care worker who contracted Ebola in Sierra Leone – the first Briton to catch the deadly virus – was flown home for treatment on Sunday, as the World Health Organization confirmed another foreign medic had caught the disease.

The World Health Organization said one of its health care workers had tested positive for Ebola for the first time in Sierra Leone.

The WHO has deployed nearly 400 people from its own staff and partner organizations since the outbreak was detected in March deep in the forest region of southeast Guinea.

In the past six months, more than 225 health workers have fallen ill and nearly 130 have lost their lives to the disease, the WHO said.


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