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HK activists vow era of civil disobedience

Founders of the Occupy Central civil disobedience movement (L-R), Reverend Chu Yiu-ming, academic Benny Tai and academic Chan Kin-man, hit drums during a campaign to kick off the movement in front of the financial Central district in Hong Kong August 31, 2014. REUTERS/Liau Chung-ren

HONG KONG: Hong Kong democracy activists vowed Sunday to embark on an “era of civil disobedience” including mass sit-ins after China announced rules giving it control over candidates in the city’s next leadership election.

The standing committee of the National People’s Congress decided that the next chief executive will be elected by popular vote in 2017, but candidates must each be backed by more than half the members of a 1,200-strong “broadly representative nominating committee.”

Democracy advocates in the semi-autonomous Chinese city say this means Beijing will be able to ensure a sympathetic slate of candidates and exclude opponents.

“This is one person, one vote, but there is no choice. They have that in North Korea but you can’t call it democracy,” Democratic Party chairwoman Emily Lau told AFP.

The pro-democracy group Occupy Central said it would go ahead with its threat to take over the city’s Central financial district in protest, at an unspecified date.

Hundreds rallied in a park outside the city’s legislature late Sunday chanting “No to fake democracy!” and blowing vuvuzelas.

“A new chapter is unfolding in Hong Kong. It is an era of civil disobedience,” Benny Tai, a co-founder of Occupy, told supporters in front of a stage decked with two large Chinese characters that spelled the word “Disobedience.”

“I am very sad,” Henry Chung, a 37-year-old scriptwriter, said. “We have waited so many years. But now we have nothing.”

Public discontent in the former British colony handed back to China in 1997 is at its highest for years over perceived interference by Beijing, with the election method for the chief executive a touchstone issue.

The text of the NPC decision, released by the official news agency Xinhua, said universal suffrage must have “institutional safeguards” to take into account “the actual need to maintain long-term prosperity and stability of Hong Kong.”

NPC official Li Fei dismissed the activists’ demands, adding that Hong Kong’s leader must be loyal to China’s ruling Communist Party.

“The Hong Kong leader must be a person who loves the country and the Party,” he said.

Late Sunday, a large group of protesters rallied outside a hotel where Li was thought to be staying after being barred by hundreds of police officers behind barriers.

Leung Chun-ying, the city’s current chief executive who was picked by a pro- Beijing committee, hailed the NPC’s decision as a “major step forward in the development of Hong Kong’s society.”

“If we are willing, the majority of Hong Kong people, and that is some 5 million people eligible to vote, will no longer be bystanders in the next election,” he told reporters.

Beijing’s plan to vet candidates caused dismay among democracy advocates, who said it could not be considered real universal suffrage.

Activist leaders have said they intend to start with small acts of civil disobedience before launching wider direct action such as the mass sit-in to block Central’s roads.

A pro-democracy Hong Kong lawmaker broke down on live television after the NPC announcement, saying there was “no way out for Hong Kong.”

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on September 01, 2014, on page 11.

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Summary

Hong Kong democracy activists vowed Sunday to embark on an "era of civil disobedience" including mass sit-ins after China announced rules giving it control over candidates in the city's next leadership election.

Democracy advocates in the semi-autonomous Chinese city say this means Beijing will be able to ensure a sympathetic slate of candidates and exclude opponents.

NPC official Li Fei dismissed the activists' demands, adding that Hong Kong's leader must be loyal to China's ruling Communist Party.

Beijing's plan to vet candidates caused dismay among democracy advocates, who said it could not be considered real universal suffrage.

Activist leaders have said they intend to start with small acts of civil disobedience before launching wider direct action such as the mass sit-in to block Central's roads.

A pro-democracy Hong Kong lawmaker broke down on live television after the NPC announcement, saying there was "no way out for Hong Kong".


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