Movies & TV

Stars align for Stewart in the film universe

LOS ANGELES: Kristen Stewart strides into the room in a power pantsuit and high-heeled pumps. Within minutes, the actor kicks off her heels and sits cross-legged on her chair, getting comfortable to talk about the good moment in her career, a very different time from her blockbuster “Twilight” years.

Stewart has earned acclaim for her supporting roles in two art-house films: as the daughter of a woman (Julianne Moore) suffering from early onset Alzheimer’s in “Still Alice” and the assistant to an aging movie star (Juliette Binoche) in “Clouds of Sils Maria,” a Cannes Film Festival favorite.

“I am thrilled. I love movies. I don’t have those nagging, regretful feelings about either of them,” Stewart said. “It is a miracle. Jesus, when the stars align and you are allowed to feel that way, it is why movies are made. It is why they affect people.”

Critics have taken note of what the former child actress and teen phenomenon is showing the world at 24 years of age. Variety’s Peter Debruge called her “the most compellingly watchable American actress of her generation” and A.O. Scott at the New York Times said her recent roles “should help re-establish her as an insightful and unpredictable talent.”

Stewart has known Moore since she was 12 and took on “Still Alice” because she knew Moore would deliver on the difficult role. As it happens, Moore is now the overwhelming favorite to win the best actress Oscar this year for her role as Alice.

“Her capability is astounding and motivating as all hell,” Stewart said.

“I get on a set with her – and I have been acting since I was 9 – whoa, I am not there yet. I am striving; I am trying.”

Stewart’s Lydia is the untethered daughter who comes home to care for her mother, who rapidly loses her faculties at the age of 50.

“The movie is supposed to show how you deal with what you still have and you focus on what you retain, rather than what you have lost,” Stewart said.

Raised in Los Angeles by parents who work in film and television, Stewart “idolizes this industry” and would love to do big franchise movies again and even be a superhero.

Looking back at her years as Bella, the lovestruck teenager entangled in a forbidden romance with a vampire in the “Twilight” movies, Stewart is nostalgic.

“I felt into it. I loved it,” she said, adding, “I got into that for absolutely the right reasons. There was never any regret.”

People in the industry have pushed her to go find stories she wants to do and start a production company to have more power over her roles. But she’s not ready for that yet.

“I like being hired,” she said. “I like the feeling of having no control over something.”

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on January 19, 2015, on page 10.

Recommended





Advertisement

Comments

Your feedback is important to us!

We invite all our readers to share with us their views and comments about this article.

Disclaimer: Comments submitted by third parties on this site are the sole responsibility of the individual(s) whose content is submitted. The Daily Star accepts no responsibility for the content of comment(s), including, without limitation, any error, omission or inaccuracy therein. Please note that your email address will NOT appear on the site.

Alert: If you are facing problems with posting comments, please note that you must verify your email with Disqus prior to posting a comment. follow this link to make sure your account meets the requirements. (http://bit.ly/vDisqus)

comments powered by Disqus

Advertisement

FOLLOW THIS ARTICLE

Interested in knowing more about this story?

Click here